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WHO Global Report on Road Safety 2013


WHO Global Report on Road Safety 2013

The Global status report on road safety 2013 Supporting a Decade of Action

Progress is being made to make the world’s roads safer, but this critical work must be intensified and accelerated. In 2010 the governments of the world declared 2011–2020 as the Decade of Action for Road Safety. They invited the World Health Organization to prepare this report as a baseline to assess the state of global road safety at the onset of the Decade, and to be able to monitor progress over the period of the Decade. The unanimous support for this Decade of Action from Member States indicates a growing awareness that the devastating scale of road traffic injuries is a global public health and development concern.

This report shows that 1.24 million people were killed on the world’s roads in 2010. This is unacceptably high. Road traffic injuries take an enormous toll on individuals and communities as well as on national economies. Middle-income countries, which are motorizing rapidly, are the hardest hit.
 
There is a sound body of scientific evidence behind road safety interventions. Adopting and enforcing legislation relating to important risk factors – speed, drink–driving, motorcycle helmets, seat-belts and child restraints – has been shown to lead to reductions in road traffic injuries. This report illustrates some of the progress made in a number of countries to address these risk factors since publication of the first Global status report on road safety (2009). Since 2008, 35 countries have passed new laws or amended existing legislation covering one or more of these risk factors. Nevertheless, in many countries these laws are either not comprehensive in scope or are lacking altogether. Governments must do more to ensure that their national road safety laws meet best practice, and do more to enforce these laws.