RESOURCES

100913 CBR Guidelines Livelihood Component UN


100913 CBR Guidelines Livelihood Component UN

WHO UNESCO ILO IDDC
People with disabilities in low-income countries are affected by the same factors which cause poverty for others, but also face added disadvantages. Children with disabilities face barriers to education; youth with disabilities face barriers to training; adults with disabilities face barriers to decent work. Most damaging of all, families and communities may think that people with disabilities are incapable of learning skills and working.
Work is the means by which an individual can escape poverty and secure the necessities of life. The right of people with disabilities to work is laid out in international instruments such as the Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention, adopted by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in 1958 (No. 111), the ILO Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (Disabled Persons) Convention, 1983 (No. 159) and the
United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. However, the right to work is often not respected and people with disabilities encounter many barriers in trying to find and keep work.
 
By encouraging and facilitating work by women and men with disabilities, community based rehabilitation (CBR) programmes can help individuals and their families to secure the necessities of life and improve their economic and social situations. By taking into consideration the needs and views of people with disabilities and making provision for their inclusion in national poverty reduction and other development programmes,
opportunities for education, skills acquisition and work can be provided for people with disabilities and their families, enabling them to emerge from poverty. Accessing livelihood opportunities is one of the key factors in eliminating poverty.

Livelihood is part of CBR because “It is essential to ensure that both youth and adults with disabilities have access to training and work opportunities at community level”. The learning of knowledge and skills begins in the family at an early age – children watch and learn how to do things from parents and other family members. Children with disabilities should also be encouraged to learn, participate and make a contribution in the family. Likewise, disabled family members of working age should be assisted and encouraged to develop skills and start or return to work. A CBR programme that does not address the skills development and livelihood needs of youth and adults with disabilities in a community is incomplete and limits the sustainability of other efforts. The Livelihood component, like every other component of the CBR matrix, has very strong linkages with the other components. There are necessary linkages between efforts to promote and facilitate livelihood in CBR and efforts to enhance access to health care, education services and social opportunities. An individual with a disability needs to be healthy and may need an assistive device in order to work. Future work opportunities are greatly enhanced for children and youth who have access to primary and secondary education, as well as opportunities for skills training. Likewise, a person with a disability who is working is empowered and better able to obtain the necessities of life, maintain a family and participate actively in the social, cultural and political life of his/her community.